Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Talking Rays Marketing on ABC Action News

On the field, there is no doubt the Rays have had an amazing season, winning 96 games and making the postseason for the first time in six years. Off the field, the season was less than spectacular, with the Montreal situation and the continued stadium saga looming over the franchise.

As the team enters the postseason, I have noticed a lack of marketing by the team throughout the region, especially when compared to the marketing of the Tampa Bay Lightning and Tampa Bay Bucs. My tweets on the issue caught the eye of Erik Waxler of ABC Action News. Waxler paid me a visit on Wednesday and asked me a few questions about the Rays and the attitude of Rays fans.

Always great to be able to talk to a bigger audience. Many thanks to Erik Waxler and ABC Action News.


Friday, June 28, 2019

It is designed to break your heart: Thoughts on the Rays two-city solution



I have been writing about Tampa Bay baseball for over 10 years. For the first five years, I wrote about being a fan. I wrote about the World Series. I wrote about Game 162. I wrote about no-hitters, cowbells, and Rays-hawks. Then in 2014, I started this blog and dedicated myself to determining whether or not Tampa Bay was a Major League market.

As a Tampa resident, I came into the project with biases. I wanted to believe the market was not the problem.

For four years, I wrote every night. I tracked the attendance of the Rays, four Spring Training locations, and the four Minor League teams that call Tampa Bay home. I wrote about promotions. I wrote about bobbleheads. I wrote about traffic conditions and economic growth. I even wrote about hurricanes and Astros games. I was recognized for my research at Fangraphs as a resident writer in June 2017 and by mentions in articles in USA Today and several Tampa area publications.

After landing a consulting job overseas in 2018, I stopped writing regularly. On one hand, I knew writing about baseball from 5,000 miles away was going to be difficult, especially when I didn't know my work tempo. On the other hand, I decided I had written almost everything I could from open source data. From what I could acquire and what I analyzed, Tampa Bay could host a Major League team.

In theory.

Admittedly, there are a lot of problems with the current layout of baseball in Tampa Bay:
The list goes on.

A lot of work needed to be done to make Major League Baseball successful in Tampa Bay. None of these issues were alleviated in 20 years.

On Tuesday, June 25th, the Montreal boogeyman finally appeared in the flesh. After years of avoiding the M-word, Stu Sternberg and the Rays front office announced a plan to split the Rays season between Tampa Bay and Canada. According to Sternberg, the Rays would play the first 40 home games or so of the season in Tampa Bay. Then they would fly to Montreal and play out the rest of the season.

(They also may or may not move their Spring Training back to St. Petersburg from Port Charlotte, Florida in order to give local fans more product. Here is where I say I wrote years ago that Port Charlotte was a mistake and the Rays should have looked to expand their market by spring training near Orlando. But I'm just a guy with a blog.)  

The Rays will do this Tampa Bay-Montreal schedule every year. Forever.

While it is creative, this plan is befuddling at best, irrational at worst. It is like having a pitcher play every position and rotating them on the mound based on the weaknesses of each batter. Sure, it is legal, it may look great on paper, and may actually work, but it is not based in reality.

The Rays two-city solution requires two economies, two fanbases, two marketing staffs, two broadcast teams, and two stadiums (as if one was not difficult enough to fund, locate, and build). Sternberg envisions a "sister-city" relationship between Tampa Bay and Montreal marked by business investment and cooperation. He also envisions tourists travelling to and from each city bonded by fandom.

It is almost as if Sternberg wants St. Petersburg and Montreal to share the Rays as Tampa and New York share the Yankees. Per the latest data, approximately 12% of Tampa Bay roots for the Yankees and the Yankees presence is seen on billboards and marquees in Tampa throughout the spring. Instead of openly advocating for Major League Baseball to eradicate this conflict, and create a monopoly of baseball interest in the Tampa Bay region, Sternberg is using the Yankees-Tampa relationship as a model.

For Tampa Bay, Sternberg is advocating a smaller, more intimate, open-air stadium where the estimated one million Rays fans will buy one or two tickets per season over 40 games. What he fails to understand is that there will still be baseball in the area. After the Rays have their proposed "mid-season send off", local baseball fans can still spend their dollars and evenings watching Minor League Baseball at Spectrum Field in Clearwater, Steinbrenner Field in Tampa, LECOM Field in Bradenton, and a newly refurbished Auto Exchange Stadium in Dunedin. All of which are cheaper than Rays games and require much less emotional investment. Emotional investment that used to be spent on the Rays.

Former Major League Commissioner Bart Giamatti once famously wrote,
"It breaks your heart. It is designed to break your heart. The game begins in the spring, when everything else begins again, and it blossoms in the summer, filling the afternoons and evenings, and then as soon as the chill rains come, it stops and leaves you to face the fall alone. You count on it, rely on it to buffer the passage of time, to keep the memory of sunshine and high skies alive, and then just when the days are all twilight, when you need it most, it stops."
Stu Sternberg and the Tampa Bay Rays are planning to break the hearts of Tampa Bay when the summer is at it's peak. When the evening showers and humidity weigh down the soul of Florida. When our lethargic summer saunters are matched only by the leisurely pace of baseball. For over 20 years in Tampa Bay, fans waited patiently for their two weeks of Fall with a local beer and a Cuban, cheering on the local nine. Now the realities of politics and economics threaten to replace their summer respite with a vast emptiness. Their season will end early, and like Rogers Hornsby, they will stare out the window, remembering the distant echoes of the crack of the bat and listening for the faint advancement of professional football and hockey - franchises that call Tampa Bay home from start to finish.

The biggest shame of this whole debacle is that Stu Sternberg has roots in Brooklyn. He likes to remind listeners that he named his son after Sandy Koufax. But what would Brooklyn have said to Walter O'Malley if he told the Dodger faithful their beloved Bums would split time between Brooklyn and Los Angeles, that they would leave for the West Coast in the middle of every season? How would a Brooklyn business owner named Samuel Sternberg, a family man and soon-to-be father of Stu Sternberg, have reacted?

O'Malley probably would have been booed out of town. With this idea, Sternberg deserves the same.

Monday, January 7, 2019

Rays cede cheap seats to local Minor League Baseball

Been a while. Not sure if I will post as regularly or just on occasion. But there has been a lot of baseball news in Tampa Bay this offseason. Some of which has been covered very well. For now, when I see an angle that I don’t think is being covered, I’ll discuss it here.)

As most baseball fans in the Tampa Bay area are now aware, last week the Rays announced they are closing off seating in the 300 level, reducing the total capacity in Tropicana Field from 31,042 to somewhere between 25,000-26,000.

Of course, the jury is still out on what the Rays are doing to the space those seats used to occupy. As par for the course, the Rays front office used words like “intimate” and “better fan experience”. Deadspin’s Barry Petchesky rebuked those claims well in his article.

“Intimate,” that buzzword used by every team that moves to a smaller stadium, or renovates its existing one to have a smaller capacity—or just dreams of doing so. It’s about the “fan experience,” you see. Unless the fan experience you’re looking for is buying the cheapest ticket possible because sometimes it’s fun to go to a ballgame and sit in the nosebleeds and eat a dang hotdog.
For now, the Rays claim there will still be cheap ticket options at Tropicana Field. But the Rays still use dynamic pricing so fans only know how much a ticket will cost when tickets are set before the season. By driving up scarcity, and letting the dynamic pricing model take hold as the season progresses, the price of seats goes up according to demand, not by tier. As well, games against the Yankees and Red Sox will always be more expensive, despite attendance against each of those teams decreasing drastically since 2010.



The bigger question remains: Does MLB in Tampa Bay and beyond need cheap ticket options? There are few inexpensive options for NHL, NBA, and NFL games, so why should there be in baseball? Are fans married to the Norman Rockwell myth of knothole gangs looking through wooden fences in the 1940s? 

Are those myths as outdated as speedy lead-off men and starting pitchers?
There will always be inexpensive baseball options in America, and especially in the Tampa Bay area. Despite a 7% decrease from 2016*, Tampa Bay’s four Minor League teams – the Threshers, Marauders, Tarpons, and Blue Jays – combined drew over 350,000 fans for the 8th year in a row in 2018.

(2017 featured Tebow Mania.)



Local Minor League Baseball has always been in competition with the Rays, especially in the spring months of April and May. They market to casual baseball fans with cheaper ticket options, no dynamic pricing, and the same, if not better, “intimacy and fan experience”. There is a reason the Rays worst attended month (May) is typically the local Minor League teams’ best. Tampa Bay area Minor League teams are more conveniently located to most Tampa Bay baseball fans and the teams play outdoors, feature fireworks, and often have the same food and beer options as the Rays.

All for ticket and parking prices far cheaper than Tropicana Field – sometimes as low as $1.
Unlike nearly every other Major League team, the Rays never had a monopoly on low price point baseball in their region. Fans have always had cheaper and more convenient baseball options. And as long as there is Spring Training in Tampa Bay, there will be Florida State League baseball in Tampa Bay.

With their announcement last week, the Rays focused on their niche – dedicated fans who will travel to Tropicana Field to buy tickets to see Major League Baseball. That number will be between 1.1 million and 2.1 million in 2019. Even as the 100-loss Devil Rays, the Rays never drew less than 1 million, so don’t expect attendance to drop that low. And if the current maximum seating is 26,000 per game, the Rays can only max 2.1 million in 81 games.

It will be curious to see if Minor League Baseball in the Tampa Bay area will capitalize on the Rays decision and increase their marketing to casual fans looking for lower price point baseball options.

(It’s good to be back.)

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Moving on

This is the end.

For now, possibly. Or maybe for good. I haven’t decided. But this website won’t be as active as it was in the past. And I owe you an explanation why.
  1. For most of the 2018 baseball season, I will not be living in the US. I will be 5,000 miles away doing analysis for the US Government. I left Tampa Bay during the first week of February and won’t be back until August at the earliest. It will be stressful challenge to write about baseball daily from my location.
  2. Although Tampa Bay is a growing vibrant area with billions in new construction and rising income and arriving businesses, I am not convinced the baseball market will be anything but a convoluted mess of hyperlocal interests superseding regional interests. For anyone who lives in Tampa Bay, this is not out of the norm.
  3. I think I am maxed out on new research. I can update charts and graphs, but as long as things stay the same – and they will until the Rays stadium situation is rectified – public data can’t give me any new insight that I don’t already have.
  4. I am tired of getting into the same arguments. Those who have been with me since Day 1 with this website are either interested, agree, or have expressed their differing opinions long ago. People in the know know who I am and what this website is all about. Anyone else without a blue twitter checkmark will need to email me.
  5. I am not convinced the Rays will stay in Tampa Bay. It is difficult for me to be motivated to track the business of a team that may not exist in 10 years. The Ybor location, while nice, doesn’t have the funding and as I have said numerous times, unless a million people move within 30 minutes of Tropicana Field in 5 years, it will remain a horrible location.
If you have read this far, thank you.

I started this website in January 2014. It began as a project while I was enrolled in the USF MBA program where I could showcase my analytical skills in business on a topic I was very familiar with – baseball in the Tampa Bay area. I had written about the Rays for several blogs as well as covered the Florida State League for MiLB.com and other sites.

I figured if I could add my growing business acumen to a discussion on baseball in Tampa Bay I could fill an unfulfilled niche. That is what business is all about, finding opportunities and making products to fill those opportunities. The goal was not to make money, but to prove I could write about business, do some solid analysis, and maybe convey my findings to a wider audience. If my findings made the desk of decision makers, even better.

Entering this project, I had two major assumptions: 1) Tampa Bay is a growing market 2) The market of baseball in Tampa Bay is highly competitive. I quickly concluded that there is more baseball in Tampa Bay from February to October than in any other city. Tampa Bay has four spring training teams, four minor league teams, and one Major League team. Combined, there are over 400 home games every calendar year in Tampa Bay.

As I continued, I found data that showed fan behavior and fan allegiances in Tampa Bay. Of course, it is now common knowledge that Tropicana Field is too far from the center of the region’s population, but I also published articles on rooting interest, discovering that only 50% of baseball fans in Tampa Bay are Rays fans. Another 20% are Yankees fans, roughly 6% are Red Sox fans, and the remaining 24% are fans of other teams.

While that was eye-opening, it wasn’t entirely a surprise. Florida metro areas are often landing places for people wanting to escape the cold of the north. These people bring their fandoms and they rarely ever change (despite all the fans and radio hosts who want them to). Local spring training also serves to reinforce out-of-town fandom by allowing those fans to spend money on their teams in March and April. 

Other research showed that roughly 50% of Spring Training attendance in Tampa, and 25% of Spring attendance in Clearwater and Dunedin were locals. Local money was going into the coffers of teams that were not the local Major League team. Adding insult to injury, two of the local spring training teams are in the Rays division.

When I started this project, I looked at the leases for the local Spring Training teams. I thought perhaps there was a way for the Rays to gain more of a share of the local market if Tampa Bay spring training teams left when their leases expired. If I could enlighten people to the idea that Tampa Bay was overstretched and oversaturated, perhaps local politicians would see past their hyperlocal ideals and see the big sports picture.

Then Hillsborough County gave the Yankees 20 more years for no reason and Pinellas is ready to extend the Blue Jays – contrary to every economic study saying it is a bad idea.

So the landscape of the Tampa Bay baseball market isn’t changing, even if it is to the detriment of the Major League franchise.

That brings us to my efforts this season.

The highlight of my 2017 and the peak of this project was when I was featured as a Fangraphs Resident for the month of June. To be acknowledged within the baseball research community as a person in the know who could bring clarification to an ongoing problem was awesome.

Definitely the highlight of this website’s effort.

Unfortunately, while the baseball research community embraced me, local sports media rarely did. Only a small percentage talked to me about my findings and even fewer allowed me a bigger forum to discuss my ideas.

It would have been nice to get a little love from Tampa Bay Times beat writer Marc Topkin or be asked to appear on any of the many local sports radio shows. Their hosts knew who I was and in many cases followed me on social media.

Let me be clear for the media folks who ignored me or outright dismissed me: I do and have done analysis for over 20 years in various forms. I have provided insight to corporate executives and senior military leaders around the world. I take being ignored or dismissed as a professional slight. You and your audience are worse off and less educated because of your inaction. Congratulations.

Now that I have that off my chest, I do want to thank the many people who have read, commented constructively, or even just followed for the sake of learning something. You are all awesome and greatly appreciated.

There is a saying that writers should write for themselves and if anyone follows, then great. That is true to a point. I believe eventually the relationship between writer and audience becomes symbiotic, with both sides feeding from each other. The writer is given extra motivation from the community and the community enjoys more work from the writer.

That’s how I felt for most of this website’s existence. So thank you to all who read.

As I mentioned in the intro, I may post occasionally. I may still track attendance on my daily spreadsheets and may still post monthly trends. But I won’t be putting near as much energy into this site. I think four years is long enough.

Again, thank you to all who read and interacted. I greatly appreciate it. We had fun.

Monday, February 12, 2018

Dunedin Blue Jays 2017 Attendance Review

Welcome to our 5th attendance review of 2017 and the 11th attendance review post on the Dunedin Blue Jays, minor league affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays.

Background:

The Dunedin Blue Jays began play in the Florida State League in 1987. After three seasons playing at Grant Field, the Dunedin Blue Jays moved to Florida Exchange Stadium in 1990. Florida Exchange Stadium is also the spring training home of the Toronto Blue Jays. The current population of Dunedin is 35,444.

Dunedin Blue Jays 2017:

Home Games: 69
Total attendance: 38,956 (down 22% from 2016: 50,063)
Average attendance: 572 (down 25% from 2016: 770)
Highest attended game: 4,527 on Monday, July 3rd vs Daytona
Lowest attended game: 291 on Tuesday, August 22nd vs Florida
Average Time of Game: 2 hours, 43 minutes
Double headers: 1 (May 25)
Cancellations: 0
Notable rehab assignments: Josh Donaldon, Troy Tulowitzki
Other notable appearances: None

Breakdown:
(red highlight = below 2016 annual average of 572)

Overall:




By Month:
The following graph depicts the average attendance by month.




By Day:



Blue Jays attendance increased 5% on the weekend compared to their average Monday through Thursday attendance.
  • Mon-Thurs average attendance: 559 (38 games)
  • Fri-Sun average attendance: 588 (31 games)
  • Difference: 5%
The following graph depicts the average attendance by day.



The following chart looks at how often daily attendance increases when compared to the day prior.




By Opponent:




By Starting Pitcher:



This chart depicts how attendance reacted from one starter to the next. If a pitcher is a great draw, the percentage between he and the prior starter should be higher.


For other years, see:

Thursday, February 1, 2018

Clearwater Threshers 2017 Attendance Review

Welcome to our fourth attendance review of 2017 and our eleventh attendance review of the Clearwater Threshers. Today we look at the home attendance of the 2017 Clearwater Threshers.

Overview: The Clearwater Threshers began play in the Florida State League in 1985. The Threshers moved to Bright House Field in 2004. Bright House Field is also the spring training home of the Philadelphia Phillies. In 2013, the population of Clearwater was 109,703.

Clearwater Threshers 2017:

Home Games: 72

Total attendance: 200,201 (up 10% from 2016: 181,594)

Per Game Average: 2,988 (up 10% from 2016: 2,710)

Highest attended game: 9,729 on Monday, July 3rd vs Tampa

Lowest attended game: 1,211 on Wednesday, July 26th vs Daytona

Double headers: 5 (Apr 13, June 5, June 14, July 25, July 30)

Cancellations: 0

Average time of game: 2 hours, 31 minutes

Notable rehab assignments: None

Other notable appearances: None
Breakdown:

(red highlight = below annual average of 2,988)

Overall:





Top 10 attended games:




By Month:





The following graph depicts the average attendance by month.






By Day of the Week:





Threshers attendance increased 11% on the weekends compared to their average Monday through Thursday attendance.
  • Mon-Thurs average attendance: 2,867 (41 games)

  • Fri-Sun average attendance: 3,179 (26 games)

  • Increase: 10.8%
The following graph depicts the average attendance by day.




The following chart shows how often each day outdrew the game prior.



By Opponent:




By Starting Pitcher:




The following chart depicts how attendance reacted from one starter to the next. If a pitcher is a great draw, the percentage between he and the prior starter should be higher.




Additional Clearwater Threshers Reviews:

2016 Clearwater Threshers Attendance Review
2015 Clearwater Threshers Attendance Review
2014 Clearwater Threshers Attendance Review
2013 Clearwater Threshers Attendance Review
2012 Clearwater Threshers Attendance Review
2011 Clearwater Threshers Attendance Review
2010 Clearwater Threshers Attendance Review
2009 Clearwater Threshers Attendance Review
2008 Clearwater Threshers Attendance Review
2007 Clearwater Threshers Attendance Review

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Tampa Bay Rays 2017 Attendance Review

Welcome to our third attendance review of 2016 and our eleventh annual attendance review of the Tampa Bay Rays. Today we will look at the home attendance of the 2017 Tampa Bay Rays.

(This review only includes games played at Tropicana Field. Games relocated due to Hurricane Irma do will not be counted.)

Total attendance: 1,204,019 (down 82,144 tickets sold (6.5%) from 2016: 1,286,163)

Per Game Average: 15,637 (down 241 fans per game from 2016: 15,878)

Highest attended game: 31,042 (Opening Day) Sunday, April 2nd, vs NY

Lowest attended game: 6,509 on Tuesday, Sept 5th vs MIN

Lowest point of average attendance: June 9th, Game 33 (Avg attendance: 14,329)

Average Time of Game: 3 hours, 11 minutes (up 11 minutes from 2016: 3 hrs, 0 minutes)

Breakdown:

(red shading = below annual average of 15,637)

Overall:




Rays top 10 most attended games:




By Month:




The following graph depicts the average attendance by month.




By Day of the Week:




Following typical trends, the Rays drew poorly during the week and better on weekends. Rays attendance increased % on the weekends compared to their average Monday through Thursday attendance.
  • Mon-Thurs average attendance: 13,316 (37 games)
  • Fri-Sat-Sun average attendance: 17,785 (40 games)
  • Increase: 33.5%

The following graph depicts the average attendance by day.




The following chart shows how often each day outdrew the day before.




By Opponent:



By Starting Pitcher:



Our next chart depicts how attendance reacted from one starter to the next. If a pitcher is a great draw, the percentage between he and the prior starter should be higher.




Day Game / Night Game Splits:




Here is how the Rays performed at various levels of attendance. Note: the Rays played a doubleheader, making this chart 1 less than other game totals.




  • For analysis of the Rays 2016 attendance, click here.
  • For analysis of the Rays 2015 attendance, click here.
  • For analysis of the Rays 2014 attendance, click here.
  • For analysis of the Rays 2013 attendance, click here.
  • For analysis of the Rays 2012 attendance, click here.
  • For analysis of the Rays 2011 attendance, click here.
  • For analysis of the Rays 2010 attendance, click here.
  • For analysis of the Rays 2009 attendance, click here.
  • For analysis of the Rays 2008 attendance, click here.
  • For analysis of the Devil Rays 2007 attendance, click here.

Monday, January 29, 2018

Bradenton Marauders 2017 Attendance Review

Welcome to our second attendance review of 2017 and our eighth attendance review of the Bradenton Marauders. This post continues our series of looking back at trends in Tampa Bay area fan behavior since 2007. Today we look at the home attendance of the 2016 Bradenton Marauders.

Overview: The Bradenton Marauders began play in the Florida State League in 2010. The Marauders play their home games at McKechnie Field. McKechnie Field is also the spring training home of the Pittsburgh Pirates. In 2013, the population of Bradenton was 51,763.

Bradenton Marauders 2017:

Home Games: 63

Total attendance: 79,331 (down 9% from 2016: 87,149)


Per Game Average: 1,300 (down 3% from 2016: 1,340)


Highest attended game: 6,213 on Saturday, April 8th vs Charlotte

Lowest attended game: 541 on Monday, July 31st vs Palm Beach

Double headers: 2 (June 14, July 31)

Cancellations: 6


Average time of game: 2 hours, 39 minutes

Notable rehab assignments: None

Other notable appearances: None
Breakdown:

(red highlight = below annual average of 1,300)

Overall:




By Month:




The following graph depicts the average attendance by month.




By Day of the Week:




Marauders attendance increased 44% on the weekends compared to their average Monday through Thursday attendance.
  • Mon-Thurs average attendance: 843
  • Fri-Sun average attendance: 1,915
  • Increase: 44%

The following graph depicts the average attendance by day.




The following chart shows how often each day outdrew the game prior.




By Opponent:




By Starting Pitcher:




The following chart depicts how attendance varied from one starter to the next. If a pitcher is a great draw, the percentage between he and the prior starter should be higher.




Additional Bradenton Marauders Reviews:

Attendance Review: 2016 Bradenton Marauders
Attendance Review: 2015 Bradenton Marauders
Attendance Review: 2014 Bradenton Marauders
Attendance Review: 2013 Bradenton Marauders
Attendance Review: 2012 Bradenton Marauders
Attendance Review: 2011 Bradenton Marauders
Attendance Review: 2010 Bradenton Marauders

Sunday, January 28, 2018

Tampa Yankees 2017 Attendance Review

Welcome to our first 2017 attendance review and our 11th attendance review post on the Tampa Yankees, minor league affiliate of the New York Yankees.

Background:

The Tampa Yankees began play in 1994. After two seasons playing at the University of South Florida, the Tampa Yankees moved to Legends Field, a stadium built across the street from Raymond James Stadium, home of the NFL’s Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Legends Field was renamed Steinbrenner Field in 2008. The current population of Tampa is 352,957.

Tampa Yankees 2017:


Home Games: 69

Total attendance: 93,823 (up 28% from 2016: 73,278)

Average: 1,421 (up 22% from 2016: 1,163)

Highest attended game: 7,157 on Saturday, August 12th vs St Lucie

Lowest attended game: 587 on Thursday, August 31st vs Lakeland

Double headers: 3 (Apr 13, May 20, Aug 30)

Cancellations: 2

Average Time of Game: 2 hours, 30 minutes

Notable rehab assignments: None

Other notable appearances: Tim Tebow with the St Lucie Mets, Aug 10-13

Breakdown:
(red highlight = below annual average of 1,421)

Overall:




By Month:




The following graph depicts the average attendance by month.




By Day:




Tampa Yankees attendance increased 79% on the weekends compared to their average Monday through Thursday attendance.
  • Mon-Thurs average attendance: 1,063
  • Sat-Sun average attendance: 1,907
  • Difference: +79%

The following graph depicts the average attendance by day.




The following chart shows how often each day outdrew the day prior.




Saturdays were a good draw, outdrawing the game prior 88% of the time. No Sundays outdrew Saturdays.

By Opponent:




By Starting Pitcher:




This chart depicts how attendance reacted from one starter to the next. If a pitcher is a great draw, the percentage between he and the prior starter should be higher.




Here are links to past Tampa Yankees seasons since 2007.